Walkthroughs

Walkthrough: Analyze DI Face Detection Recognition

Let’s check out the new features of the Face Detection within Griffeye Analyze DI. Make sure in the Analyze Forensic Market you have the Face and Video utility pack both activated before you create your case. Once you do so, we can go ahead and create a new case, and bring in our data. I’m going to call it the ‘Training Case – Faces’. Bring in the folder containing the images in our investigation.

Now, when you bring the case in, make sure that you have the Face Detection and Recognition turned on in the video options and, after the import is done, make sure that you have the face detection app checked so that it can run after it ingests the data. Now, Griffeye is going to go through its normal ingestion process, analyzing and doing what it needs to do, and once this process is done, it will begin running the face detection app that we can then use later, as you can see here.

Now realize, this may take a little bit of time, as it has to go through all the files and detect faces in each and every one of them.

Once the face detection has been completed, notice in the grid view that there’s an additional column now for the number of faces detected in each file, which we can sort by if we’d like. I’m going to sort this by least faces to most, scroll back up, and now I’m going to select an image with 16 faces in it, go back to the thumbnail view, and I’ve sorted by the amount of faces.

I can also filter down to files that have faces, files that have more than one face, or I can select all the files that don’t have faces. If I locate a file within my case that contains a face and I want to search for additional faces that are similar to that face, I can right-click, go to search, and then, Similar Faces. And this will bring me to the search results and show me all the files that it has found similar faces in, including video.

Let’s take a look at the video that the face was detected in a little more closely. I go to the File View, select Video Player, and I can filter this video down to just the segments that show the face. I can actually select a specific face if I’d like. This is the one it’s found in the video, so I’m going to select it. And notice that the play controls now have changed and I have a filtered view. The video is now playing only the segment that contains the face that I ran the search for.

I can also perform a similarity search based on that face by clicking on Video Chart, and I’m going to locate where in the video I want to perform a similarity search – right about here – and very similar to an image file, I can just select the area of the face and then click the button that says search for similar faces. And when it does so, it’s kicked me back out to the search view and has shown me the similar face results.

I can also perform an external image search for a similar face in the Search tab, making sure I have my search method checked to Similar Faces, and then I’ll add the external image of the face I’m looking for. It then runs the similarity search and gives me the results of all the files within the case that contain that face. Another way is dragging a file externally into the file view, and then using the selection tool to zoom in on the face, and then selecting the box to search for similar faces. Again, that sends me back to the search view, and now it’s shown me all the files, including videos, that have similar faces.

We can now create a visual diagram in Analyze Relations of any file selected based on similar faces found. We right-click, open Analyze Relations, and from here, when we select the Relations wheel, we have the option of Face. This will display a visual diagram of all the faces related to this particular face, and then we can expand it out, and continue on, and relate other files as necessary.

Analyze DI helps investigators work through complicated cases by improving triage. It makes it easy to import, process and review large amounts of information. Find out more on Griffeye’s website.

About scar

Scar de Courcier is an assistant editor at Forensic Focus.

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